Spice Industry FAQ : Export, Import, Supply, Market - Spice Exporters Directory

Spice Industry FAQ : Export, Import, Supply, Market

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Below is a list highlighting 15 of India’s top trading partners in terms of countries that imported the most Indian shipments by dollar value during 2018. Also shown is each import country’s percentage of total Indian exports.

United States: US$51.6 billion (16% of total Indian exports)
United Arab Emirates: $29 billion (9%)
China: $16.4 billion (5.1%)
Hong Kong: $13.2 billion (4.1%)
Singapore: $10.4 billion (3.2%)
United Kingdom: $9.8 billion (3%)
Germany: $9 billion (2.8%)
Bangladesh: $8.8 billion (2.7%)
Netherlands: $8.7 billion (2.7%)
Nepal: $7.3 billion (2.3%)
Belgium: $6.8 billion (2.1%)
Vietnam: $6.7 billion (2.1%)
Malaysia: $6.5 billion (2%)
Italy: $5.5 billion (1.7%)
Saudi Arabia: $5.5 billion (1.7%)

About three-fifths (60.4%) of Indian exports in 2018 were delivered to the above 15 trade partners.

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Export promotion leads to expansion of goods for the foreign market. These goods earn foreign exchange that can be used to facilitate development. Export promotion industries have a wide market for their produce for both domestic and foreign markets. They are therefore able to produce for a greater capacity.

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To start export business, the following steps may be followed :

1) Establishing an Organisation.
2) Opening a Bank Account.
3) Obtain Permanent Account Number (PAN)
4) Obtain Importer-Exporter Code (IEC) Number.
5) Obtain Registration cum membership certificate (RCMC)
6) Select products to Export
7) Select Markets
8) Find Buyers
9) Do Sampling
10) Pricing/Costing depend on Market and Products
11) Negotiation with Buyers
12) Cover Risks through ECGC

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The US is the major importer followed by China, Vietnam, the UAE, Malaysia, Saudi Arabia, the UK, Germany, Singapore and Sri Lanka. In 2014-15, India exported spices worth US$ 2.42 million. The Spices Board of India works towards the development and worldwide promotion of Indian spices.

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India primarily exports pepper, chilli, turmeric, ginger, cardamom, coriander, cumin, fennel, fenugreek, celery, nutmeg and mace garlic, tamarind and vanilla. Processed spices such as spice oils and oleoresins, mint products, curry powder, spice powders, blends and seasonings are also exported.

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India is the world’s largest producer, consumer and exporter of spices; the country produces about 75 of the 109 varieties listed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and accounts for half of the global trading in spices

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The highest levels of pepper per capita consumption was registered in Sri Lanka , followed by Malaysia, Thailand, the United States and Indonesia (Estimate in 2015)

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Saffron, Grains of Paradise, Sumac, Amchur Powder, Ajwain, Machalepi, Anardana, Juniper Berries, Black Cumin, Nigella Seed, Dried Kaffir Lime Leaves, Pasilla de Oaxaca Chile, Tasmanian Pepperberry, Piment d’Espelette are some of the rare spices available in world market.

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India primarily exports pepper, chilli, turmeric, ginger, cardamom, coriander, cumin, fennel, fenugreek, celery, nutmeg and mace garlic, tamarind and vanilla. Processed spices such as spice oils and oleoresins, mint products, curry powder, spice powders, blends and seasonings are also exported.

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Saffron is the most expensive spice in the world because of the growing process. Only a small part of the saffron flower—the stigmata—is actually used for the spice. So it takes some 75,000 saffron flowers to make just one pound of spice.

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The biggest buyers of Indian spices in 2014–15 were the US, followed by China, Vietnam, UAE, Malaysia, UK, Germany, Saudi Arabia, Thailand and Sri Lanka.

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India is the world’s largest producer, consumer and exporter of spices; the country produces about 75 of the 109 varieties listed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and accounts for half of the global trading in spices.

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Most spices are grown in the tropical regions of the world, with some thriving in the cool misty highlands. Many of the seed spices come from more temperate areas, such as coriander seed, which is grown in Northern India, Africa and the wheat producing areas of South Australia and Western New South Wales.

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Cumin is the most popular spice in the world, and coriander (or cilantro) is the most commonly used herb. In Europe and Africa, garlic is the most common among all dishes considered, and oregano is common in the Mediterranean regions.

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Christopher Columbus went westwards from Europe in 1492 to find a sea route to the lands of spices but found the Americas. In 1497 the Portuguese navigator Vasco da Gama discovered a sea route around the southern tip of Africa, eventually reaching Kozhikode on the southwest coast of India in 1498.

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