Spice Industry FAQ : Spice, Herbs - Spice Exporters Directory

Spice Industry FAQ : Spice, Herbs

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Contrary to popular belief, freezing spices and herbs is not necessarily beneficial. In fact, it may cause more harm than good due to condensation. When you take a jar or bag of spices out of the freezer, condensation can form on the surface, leading to the introduction of unwanted moisture. This is why ground spices have a shorter shelf life compared to whole spices or seeds. Therefore, it’s best to avoid freezing spices and herbs altogether.

Some individuals prefer to store red spices such as chili powder, cayenne pepper, and paprika in the refrigerator to preserve their color and flavor. However, as mentioned above, about storing food in the freezer, storing these spices in the refrigerator can do more harm than good. The moisture in the refrigerator can cause these spices to clump together and lose their potency over time. It’s best to store these spices in a cool, dry place, such as a pantry or spice cabinet, away from direct sunlight and heat sources. This will help to maintain their flavor and texture for a longer period of time.

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Allspice is a spice made from the dried berries of a plant known as Pimenta dioica, which is a member of the myrtle family. The flavor of allspice brings to mind cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, and pepper. Allspice is used in Caribbean, Middle Eastern, and Latin American cuisines, among others

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Common cooking herbs include basil, oregano, marjoram, parsley, rosemary, thyme and dill. Common culinary spices include cinnamon, paprika (another pepper), tumeric, ginger, saffron and cumin. Ginger and garlic are both considered spices as well.

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spice is a vegetation product that has an aromatic or pungent to the taste quality which is used for flavoring while cooking. On the other hand, a seasoning is a mixture of several flavoring components such as sugars, salts and spices. Thus, a spice can thought of as a subset of a seasoning.

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Here are four expert-recommended tools to help you get the most flavor out of your spices.
Mortar and Pestle
Microplane Grater
Manual Coffee Grinder
Electric Coffee Grinder

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In most instances, “red pepper” refers to cayenne pepper or chili powder (not the spice mix designed for making chili con carne, but dried, ground chilis). It is usually spicy rather than being red bell pepper.

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Cardamom was used as a breath freshener by the ancient Egyptians and a digestive aid in traditional Indian medicine, but most importantly, it’s delicious — warm and sweet in a way that pairs well with many savory dishes (think poultry, curries and all kinds of rice dishes)

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In cooking, it’s used more like a spice, but salt doesn’t actually add its own flavor. Salt is neither an herb nor a spice, both of which are obtained from plants. It is a mineral.

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It’s a Spice. … But coffee has uses beyond being a deliciously addictive caffeine fix to be guzzled down at all hours of the day. Coffee is also a spice that can add a rich, deep, and earthy flavor to other foods, particularly red meats.

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India is known as the ‘The home of spices‘. There is no other country in the world that produces as many kinds of spices as India.

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India primarily exports pepper, chilli, turmeric, ginger, cardamom, coriander, cumin, fennel, fenugreek, celery, nutmeg and mace garlic, tamarind and vanilla. Processed spices such as spice oils and oleoresins, mint products, curry powder, spice powders, blends and seasonings are also exported.

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The active ingredient in pepper spray is capsaicin, which is a chemical derived from the fruit of plants in the genus Capsicum, including chilis. Extraction of oleoresin capsicum (OC) from peppers requires capsicum to be finely ground, from which capsaicin is then extracted using an organic solvent such as ethanol.

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White pepper is a spice produced from the dried fruit of the pepper plant, Piper nigrum, as is black pepper. It is usually milder than black pepper, with less complex flavor.

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Cloves contain small amounts of calcium, magnesium and vitamin E . Cloves are low in calories and provide some fiber, manganese, vitamin K and vitamin C.

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The taste is pungent, strong and sweet with a bitter, astringent flavor as well. Cloves also have a distinct and undeniable warmth; to some, the flavor is almost hot. This spice is simply that intense! Consuming this spice leaves a sensation in the mouth similar to that of nutmeg.

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The clove tree is most often grown from seed. Plant clove seeds in well drained and fertile loam and water, then feed them regularly. Keep the soil where clove is growing wet but not waterlogged.

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Black pepper and black peppercorns start as green peppercorns, which are the unripe fruit of the piper nigrum plant. The fruits grow in long, thin bunches on the vine, clustered somewhat like grapes. These bright green fruits are first cooked and then sun-dried.

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Cloves are the rich, brown, dried, unopened flower buds of Syzygium aromaticum, an evergreen tree in the myrtle family. The name comes from the French “clou” meaning nail. Cloves come from Madagascar, Indonesia and Sri Lanka. Cloves are used in spice cookies and cakes.

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The Carolina Reaper delivers an average of 1,569,300 Scoville Heat Units (SHU). As a comparison, jalapeno peppers score between 2,500 to 8,000 SHU
Hence, Carolina Reaper is the world’s hottest chilli pepper.

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The most common reason people sweat when they eat involves spicy foods like peppers. Peppers have a chemical called capsaicin that triggers the nerves that make your body feel warmer, so you sweat to cool it back down.

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Saffron has a very subtle flavor and aroma — some say it’s floral, some say it’s like honey, and some would just say pungent. The flavor can be hard to nail down and described. If you’re going for authenticity in dishes like paella and bouillabaisse, you’ve got to have saffron

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Saffron, Grains of Paradise, Sumac, Amchur Powder, Ajwain, Machalepi, Anardana, Juniper Berries, Black Cumin, Nigella Seed, Dried Kaffir Lime Leaves, Pasilla de Oaxaca Chile, Tasmanian Pepperberry, Piment d’Espelette are some of the rare spices available in world market.

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India primarily exports pepper, chilli, turmeric, ginger, cardamom, coriander, cumin, fennel, fenugreek, celery, nutmeg and mace garlic, tamarind and vanilla. Processed spices such as spice oils and oleoresins, mint products, curry powder, spice powders, blends and seasonings are also exported.

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Saffron is the most expensive spice in the world because of the growing process. Only a small part of the saffron flower—the stigmata—is actually used for the spice. So it takes some 75,000 saffron flowers to make just one pound of spice.

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Most spices are grown in the tropical regions of the world, with some thriving in the cool misty highlands. Many of the seed spices come from more temperate areas, such as coriander seed, which is grown in Northern India, Africa and the wheat producing areas of South Australia and Western New South Wales.

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Cardamom: The Queen of Spices. This exotic spice has an intoxicating, rich aroma with complex flavors of sweet floral notes, camphor, lemon, mint and a hint of pepper. Cardamom is the dried seed pod of an herbaceous perennial plant in the ginger family and is native to India, Bhutan and Nepal.

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Herbs are the usable parts of herbaceous plants (plants that lack a woody stem). The word herb most often refers to those that have culinary, cosmetic, or medicinal uses. In general use, herbs are used for food, flavoring, medicine, or fragrances due to their savory and aromatic properties.

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bay leaf is a fragrant leaf from a laurel tree that is used as an herbBay leaves can be used fresh or dried; dried bay leaves tend to have a slightly stronger flavor.

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Rosemary is an herb in the mint family. It is a small evergreen shrub, Rosmarinus officinalis, whose 1-inch leaves resemble curved pine needles. Rosemary is native to the Mediterranean.

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Cloves are the aromatic flower buds of a tree in the family Myrtaceae, Syzygium aromaticum. They are native to the Maluku Islands (or Moluccas) in Indonesia, and are commonly used as a spice.

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Onion powder is dehydrated, ground onion that is commonly used as a seasoning. It is a common ingredient in seasoned salt and spice mixes, such as beau monde seasoning. Some varieties are prepared using toasted onion.

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Garlic powder is made from garlic cloves that have been dehydrated and ground into fine particles. The flavor is garlicky but vastly different than fresh-chopped garlic. It tastes sweeter and much less assertive than fresh garlic, but also without the caramelly undertones that you get from roasted or sautéd garlic.

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Cinnamon is a spice obtained from the inner bark of several tree species from the genus Cinnamomum. Cinnamon is used mainly as an aromatic condiment and flavouring additive in a wide variety of cuisines, sweet and savoury dishes, breakfast cereals, snackfoods, tea and traditional foods.

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Whole spices are a favorite of cooks everywhere who like to have the freshest, most vibrant flavor in their foods. Whole spices are great. They usually keep for longer than their ground counterparts, since they lose less oil to the air than ground spices. You should always store spices in a cool, dark place.

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As seasoning makers like McCormick point out, spices do not actually spoil. Over time, spices will lose their potency and not flavor your food as intended. As a general rule, whole spices will stay fresh for about 4 years, ground spices for about 3 to 4 years and dried leafy herbs for 1 to 3 years.

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Store your herbs and spices in clean, airtight containers, away from heat and light and handle them thoughtfully. In your home, You might also keep them in a cupboard or drawer, cover the jars with large opaque labels or use a curtain to cover them when not in use.

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Plants and aromatic herbs are widely used in cooking. They include garlic, chili pepper, rosemary, basil, parsley, thyme, marjoram, sage, saffron, cumin, clove and other spices which come from afar, such as pepper and nutmeg.

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Christopher Columbus went westwards from Europe in 1492 to find a sea route to the lands of spices but found the Americas. In 1497 the Portuguese navigator Vasco da Gama discovered a sea route around the southern tip of Africa, eventually reaching Kozhikode on the southwest coast of India in 1498.

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Black pepper and have many uses. Hundreds of years ago, traders considered black pepper the king of spicesCalled “black gold,” it was one of the very first items of commerce between India and Europe. It was so valuable that entire expeditions were made in hopes of transporting more black pepper to Europe as quickly as possible.

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Seeds, such as fennel, mustard, nutmeg, and black pepper. Arils, such as mace (part of nutmeg plant fruit). Roots and rhizomes, such as turmeric, ginger and galingale.

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Garlic is a herb which belongs to lily family. Although garlic powder (mix with salt) considered as spice. All parts of a garlic plant like bulb, root, leaf and flowers have herbal quality and used as medicine for several remedies.

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Allspice., Basil, Bay Leaves, Cinnamon, cloves, ginger, mace, Chili, Cumin, Dill, Paprika, Wasabi, Pepper are some of the basic spices.

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spice is a seed, fruit, root, bark, or other plant substance primarily used for flavoring, coloring or preserving food. Spices are distinguished from herbs, which are the leaves, flowers, or stems of plants used for flavoring or as a garnish. Many spices have antimicrobial properties.

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Example for Herbs include basil, bay leaf, celery seed, chives, cilantro, dill, fennel, lemon grass, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage, tarragon, thyme and more.

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Example for Spices include cardamom, cinnamon, allspice, cloves, nutmeg, pepper, turmeric, ginger, mace, saffron, vanilla, cumin, dill seed and more.

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A spice is a seed, fruit, root, bark, or other plant substance primarily used for flavoring, coloring or preserving food. Spices are distinguished from herbs, which are the leaves, flowers, or stems of plants used for flavoring or as a garnish. Many spices have antimicrobial properties.

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Category: Spice, Herbs